PlayerUnknown Says Battlegrounds Cheats Come From China

PlayerUnknown, the game’s creator, said that he is seeing a lot of cheating in China because it has a huge player base. The game has sold over 20 million copies on PC and 10 million copies on Xbox One (pretty impressive numbers). The game has drawn comparisons to the Hunger Games, with 100 players fighting each other until one person remains.

“I don’t think that’s a problem,” said PUBG Corp CEO Chang Han Kim when asked if cheating was a big concern for the game.

However, he later told [the reporter] that cheat developers in China are mostly “looking at mobile games and seeing how they’re greatly successful in [China], so there might be lessons learnt there.”

PUBG Corp. is trying to work with the Chinese government to combat this problem, but it’s difficult because players can make money by creating cheats for PUBG. “It’s not like we’re against those players,” Kim added. “I think if those players want to enjoy a fair battleground, everyone has to work together, and we do our best as well.”

PUBG has always had anti-cheat measures in place and is now working with several security firms to combat hackers. The company plans to release a report detailing progress on this issue soon.

“I think this is one of the areas that we could still spend more time improving,” Kim admitted.

“We’ve already announced to the community that we’re going to be spending a lot more time and energy to improve anti-cheat and resolve these issues.”

The game’s popularity has led it to become one of the most popular games on Steam. However, despite its success, PUBG Corp has no plans for DLC content — at least for now.

“I think currently, no,” Kim said when asked if PUBG Corp has any plans for DLC. He added that the team wants to instead focus on “fixing bugs and some technical issues.”

PUBG’s first map, Erangel, is a 8x8km island with a lot of buildings and suitable locations to fight in, but that’s about it. Kim noted that it’s now an old map and doesn’t have as many exciting points of interest as newer maps being worked on by the team.

“It will be a more tactical, calculated type of gameplay,” Kim said when asked what players can expect from new maps. “As opposed to the current battle royale games, where sometimes it’s just like a race to the circle to see who gets there first. It’ll be interesting when someone crosses over the line first, but they’re at a slight disadvantage.”

PUBG Corp is also working on implementing vehicles into its maps. Last year, PUBG made waves with its Miramar desert map, which introduced dynamic terrain to the game. “I think there is no better way for us to prove that we can improve on our designs and technologies than making new terrains,” Kim said.

He added that the team is working on introducing different vehicle types with each new map. He also noted that it’s possible to see players hiding in plane seats and jumping out of planes in future maps.

“The best way to combat hacking is to prevent hackers from playing your game, and we’re putting a lot of effort into that right now,” Kim acknowledged. “But we also want to provide our players with the most benign and free environment for them to enjoy. So it’s not like we’re against those players. I think if those players want to enjoy a fair battleground, everyone has to work together, and we do our best as well.”

That’s why the company worked with multiple security firms to implement anti-cheat measures into PUBG Corp’s games. “We plan on sharing some of our progress soon,” Kim said.

“I think this is one of the areas that we could still spend more time improving,” he added. “We’ve already announced to the community that we’re going to be spending a lot more time and energy to improve anti-cheat and resolve these issues.”

Mike Anderson
Mike Anderson is a PC hardware enthusiast who has been writing about PCs and technology since he graduated from Virtual University. He started blogging about 5 years ago as a way to share his passion for technology with others, and he continues to write today because he loves it. When he's not writing or tinkering with computers, Mike enjoys spending time with his wife and two young children.